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Fascinating finding on people’s reactions to requests for help depending on the light in which the situation is presented from The Boston Globe 3/31/13. The blurb on the academic study frames it around charitable fundraising and asserts that asking people to “prevent a decrease” is more likely to attain a result than asking to “cause an increase”.

Fascinating finding on people’s reactions to requests for help depending on the light in which the situation is presented from The Boston Globe 3/31/13. The blurb on the academic study frames it around charitable fundraising and asserts that asking people to “prevent a decrease” is more likely to attain a result than asking to “cause an increase”.

"Thank God for stories—for those that have them, for those that tell them, for those that devour them as the soul sustenance that they are. Stories give shape to experience and allow us to go through life unblind. Without the, everything that happens would float around, undifferentiated. None of it would mean anything. Once you have a version of what happened, all the other good stuff about being human comes into play. You can laugh, feel awe, commit a passionate act, get pissed, want to change things"

Tomas Alex Tizon, reiterated in the Nieman Foundation’s excellent Telling True Stories

todaysdocument:

“A Fine Play” or a Public Nuisance? Conflicting views on The War of the Worlds

On October 30, 1938, the popular Mercury Theater broadcast a radio play directed by Orson Welles, entitled “Invasion from Mars.” This adaptation of H.G.Wells’ novel “War of the Worlds” dramatized a surprise attack on a town in New Jersey. Many took the radio play to be real — causing widespread panic. Not everyone took to the streets however, and many, like the writer of the first letter, felt that others were overreacting.
(via DocsTeach)

What would you have done upon hearing Welles’ broadcast?  Take to the streets, pick up the phone, or sit back and enjoy some good radio drama?