Instagram

""It’s easy to make images that reinforce negative stereotypes and stop people from engaging with the subject… Using daily-life scenes gives us ways we can engage with difficult subject matter.” —Tim Hetherington."

Three years ago today the world lost two of its foremost photojournalists in Libya when a mortar strike claimed the lives of Tim Hetherington & Chris Hondros.

Conflict journalists don’t exactly have a safe job description, but the world is given a chance to better understand and empathize with violence that can rip through any culture, no matter how insulated we might feel. For that we should be grateful, without people like them showing the world warts and all, or human rights observers risking their lives to report for the betterment of others’, we’d be a lot worse off than we are.

These two men, like many who have taken up the mantle in the past 140 years or so were fascinating individuals themselves, the world lost their intrepid courage and artistic voice, but their many colleagues and loved ones lost a spark of light in their lives.

hypervocal:

Brilliant. Give XKCD a click here.

Thank you XKCD, seriously, this kind of thing is pervasive even from semi-respectable organizations.

hypervocal:

Brilliant. Give XKCD a click here.

Thank you XKCD, seriously, this kind of thing is pervasive even from semi-respectable organizations.

Watch now: FRONTLINE | Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria | PBS Video

You can always count on Frontline to exemplify cutting issues through intimate human stories and efficient research reporting. A topic that has long needed to be at the forefront of conversations about today and posterity, not idiocy in Washington. Without public health security, all other debates are philosophical. Before things have really started to take a turn for the worse, drug resistant infections already claim more lives than HIV, and are so much harder to prevent the spread of even in the first world, and there is little hope for treatment. Misuse by overprescription and abuse by livestock farmers have rendered so many antibiotics useless and helped instill drug resistance, and now (as this episode does a great job of illuminating) no pharmaceutical companies research antibiotics because they’re designed to be readily available but prudently used for short regimens, meaning they’re cheap and not a source of perpetual customers.

Tim Hetherington was a real inspiration to me, & Sebastian Junger (author of The Perfect Storm and War, who co-directed the incredible documentary Restrepo with him) made a portrait of the heartbreakingly short life of the fearless photojournalist, coming to HBO on the 18th.

Hetherington died in a mortar strike covering the civil war in Libya in April 2011 at the age of 40. Ajdabiya, a city near where he died renamed its largest public square after him, calling him one of their martyrs.

"Thank God for stories—for those that have them, for those that tell them, for those that devour them as the soul sustenance that they are. Stories give shape to experience and allow us to go through life unblind. Without the, everything that happens would float around, undifferentiated. None of it would mean anything. Once you have a version of what happened, all the other good stuff about being human comes into play. You can laugh, feel awe, commit a passionate act, get pissed, want to change things"

Tomas Alex Tizon, reiterated in the Nieman Foundation’s excellent Telling True Stories

theatlantic:

Why Parents Need to Let Their Children Fail

You see, teachers don’t just teach reading, writing, and arithmetic. We teach responsibility, organization, manners, restraint, and foresight. These skills may not get assessed on standardized testing, but as children plot their journey into adulthood, they are, by far, the most important life skills I teach.
I’m not suggesting that parents place blind trust in their children’s teachers; I would never do such a thing myself. But children make mistakes, and when they do, it’s vital that parents remember that the educational benefits of consequences are a gift, not a dereliction of duty. Year after year, my “best” students — the ones who are happiest and successful in their lives — are the students who were allowed to fail, held responsible for missteps, and challenged to be the best people they could be in the face of their mistakes.
Read more. [Images: Shutterstock]


Amen.

theatlantic:

Why Parents Need to Let Their Children Fail

You see, teachers don’t just teach reading, writing, and arithmetic. We teach responsibility, organization, manners, restraint, and foresight. These skills may not get assessed on standardized testing, but as children plot their journey into adulthood, they are, by far, the most important life skills I teach.

I’m not suggesting that parents place blind trust in their children’s teachers; I would never do such a thing myself. But children make mistakes, and when they do, it’s vital that parents remember that the educational benefits of consequences are a gift, not a dereliction of duty. Year after year, my “best” students — the ones who are happiest and successful in their lives — are the students who were allowed to fail, held responsible for missteps, and challenged to be the best people they could be in the face of their mistakes.

Read more. [Images: Shutterstock]

Amen.

"Lee van der Voo tells Romenesko readers: I was just informed by State Farm here in Oregon, where I’m an independent investigative journalist, that they are dumping my office rental policy because of the kind of journalism I do. I asked whether if I were to write food reviews or puff pieces about bridal gowns they would insure me, and I was told yes, “just no controversial journalism.”"

No insurance for you, investigative reporter! | JIMROMENESKO.COM (via onaissues)

(via futurejournalismproject)